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2.1 Degree-granting Authority PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 05 March 2009 09:38

2.1 Degree-Granting Authority

The institution has degree-granting authority from the appropriate government agency or agencies.

Responsible Unit: UNC GA

Compliance Judgment

Compliance

Narrative

Under the provisions of the Second Morrill Act of 1890 enacted by the Congress of the United States of America [1], the North Carolina General Assembly passed an act during the Session of 1891 creating "The Agricultural and Mechanical College for the Colored Race" [2]. Section 3 of that act decreed:

"That the leading object of the institution would be to teach practical agriculture and the mechanic arts and such branches of learning as relate thereto, not excluding academical and classical instruction." [2]

Section 5 of the act authorized the college's president and faculty, with the consent of the board of trustees, to confer "such certificates of proficiency or marks of merit and diplomas as is usually conferred by such colleges."

The college began operations in Raleigh, NC, in 1890 - 1891 as an annex to Shaw University prior to the General Assembly act that officially created it. This was done through a temporary arrangement with the Board of Trustees of the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Art, a "white" institution located in Raleigh (now North Carolina State University). This temporary arrangement was necessary to allow the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Art to receive funding from the Second Morrill Act of 1890, which earmarked proportional funds to be allocated in bi-racial school systems and required simultaneous funding allocations to both systems. In 1890, North Carolina had no state institution of higher education serving African Americans to which funds might be awarded, hence, this temporary agreement between the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Art and Shaw University to obtain the federal funding appropriated in the Second Morrill Act of 1890. After its official creation by the North Carolina General Assembly, the college continued to operate as an annex to Shaw University for two more academic years. The Agricultural and Mechanical College for the Colored Race was relocated to Greensboro in 1893 after the city agreed to provide land and funds to construct buildings. Classes began in Greensboro during the fall of 1893 [3].

During the Session of 1915, the North Carolina General Assembly changed the name of the institution to "The Negro Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina [4]." During the Extra Session of 1938, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an act enabling The Negro Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina to "add graduate and professional courses" as well as "to establish suitable departments" to provide those courses [5].

In 1957, as part of an overhaul of public higher education in North Carolina, the North Carolina General Assembly repealed the previous statutes defining institutional "purpose" for most of the state's public institutions and substituted new "primary purpose" statements for those institutions [6]. In Section 116.45(d) of the act, the "primary purpose" of the institution, renamed the "Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina," was

"to teach the agricultural and technical arts, sciences and such branches of learning as relate thereto; the training of teachers, supervisors, and administrators for the public schools of the State, including the preparation of such teachers, supervisors, and administrators for the master's degree. Such other programs of a professional or occupational nature may be offered as shall be approved by the North Carolina Board of Higher Education, consistent with the appropriations made therefore." [6]

In 1967, by an act of the North Carolina General Assembly during its regular session, this institution, along with four other public institutions, was designated as a regional university and renamed "North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University [7]." This act also changed the "primary purpose" of A&T and the other regional universities to:

"The primary purpose of each regional university shall be the preparation of young men and women as teachers, supervisors, and administrators for the public schools of North Carolina, including the preparation of such persons for the master's degree. Said institutions may also offer instruction in the liberal arts and sciences including the preparation for the master's degree, may conduct programs of research that will increase their abilities to carry out and enlarge their stated responsibilities, extend their influence and usefulness as far as possible to persons of the area provided by the institutions who are unable to avail themselves of their advantages as resident students, to extension courses, by lectures, and by other such means as may seem to them most effective, and such other programs as are deemed necessary to meet the needs of their constituencies and of the State and as shall be approved by the North Carolina Board of Higher Education, consistent with appropriations made therefore." [7]

In 1971, the North Carolina General Assembly passed, during its regular session, "An Act to Consolidate the Institutions of Higher Learning in North Carolina." This act established the University of North Carolina as a system consisting of sixteen "constituent institutions," including North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University (A&T), that would be under the central control of the Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina effective July 1, 1972 [8]. The role of the Board of Governors includes the responsibility to:

"determine the functions, educational activities and academic programs of the constituent institutions. The Board shall also determine the types of degrees to be awarded.[8]"

In 1994, the institution received permission from the Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina to implement doctoral programs.

All degree programs at A&T have been approved by the faculty and the institution's Board of Trustees prior to their implementation [9]. Between 1957-1972, new degree programs were also approved by the North Carolina Board of Higher Education before implementation [6]. Since becoming a constituent institution of the University of North Carolina in 1972, all new degree programs have also been approved by the UNC Board of Governors [8] prior to implementation.

Procedures for the granting of degrees: Bachelor's Degrees: The requirements for graduation with a bachelor's degree from A&T are provided in the Undergraduate Bulletin [10]. When a student applies for graduation, the student's major department and school/college conduct a review of the student's academic history and present their review to the Office of the Registrar with an audit report clearing, or not clearing, the student for graduation upon the successful completion of the current semester's work. If the department and school/college review does not clear a student for graduation, the audit report will detail the student's academic deficiencies preventing the student from graduating. The Office of the Registrar also conducts a review of the applicant student's academic record before certifying that the student will have completed the faculty-prescribed curriculum in his or her major upon the successful completion of the current semester's work [11], [12].

Master's Degrees: The requirements for graduation with a master's degree from A&T are given in the Graduate Catalog [13]. When a student applies for graduation, the student's major department and the School of Graduate Studies conduct a review of the student's academic history and present their review to the Office of the Registrar with an audit report clearing, or not clearing, the student for graduation upon the successful completion of the current semester's work. If the department and school review does not clear a student for graduation, the audit report will detail the student's academic deficiencies preventing the student from graduating. The Office of the Registrar also conducts a review of the applicant student's academic record before certifying that the student will have completed the faculty-prescribed curriculum in his or her major upon the successful completion of the current semester's work [14].

Doctoral Degrees: The general requirements for graduation with a doctoral degree from A&T are given in the Graduate Catalog [13]. When a student applies for graduation, the student's major department and the School of Graduate Studies conduct a review of the student's academic history and present their review to the Office of the Registrar with an audit report clearing, or not clearing, the student for graduation upon the successful completion of the current semester's work. If the department and school review does not clear a student for graduation, the audit report will detail the student's academic deficiencies preventing the student from graduating. The Office of the Registrar also conducts a review of the applicant student's academic record before certifying that the student will have completed the faculty-prescribed curriculum in his or her major upon the successful completion of the current semester's work [14].

At commencement, the deans recommend the conferral of degrees to the chancellor by stating, "Mr. Chancellor, these candidates have completed all of the requirements for the [degree type(s)] as prescribed by the faculties of the [school or college] and are hereby recommended for the [degree type(s)] in their respective fields. Will the candidates please come forward for public recognition." After receiving the deans' recommendations, the chancellor of A&T confers those degrees at graduation, stating, "By the authority vested in me by the Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina and by the Board of Trustees of North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, I confer upon you the degree in your respective area with all the rights and privileges pertaining thereto."

Supporting Documents

[1] Second Morrill Act of 1890

[2] NC General Assembly, 1891, Chapter 549, pp. ---

[3] Undergraduate Bulletin, 1993-1994, pp. 1-2

[4] NC General Assembly, 1915, Chapter 267, p. 340

[5] NC General Assembly, 1939, Chapter 65, pp. 88-89

[6] NC General Assembly, 1956, 1957, Chapter 1142, pp. 1091-1096

[7] NC General Assembly, 1967, Chapter 1038, pp. 1494-1496

[8] NC General Assembly, 1971, Chapter 1244, pp. 1810-1828

[9] Faculty Handbook, 2007, pp. 6-17

[10] Undergraduate Bulletin, 2008-2010, pp. 69-70

[11] Registrar, Confirmation of Graduation (COG)

[12] Registrar, Substitution Waiver Form

[13] Graduate Catalog, 2008-2010, pp. 36-44

[14] Graduate Studies, Final Graduation Clearance Form

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Last Updated ( Tuesday, 02 February 2010 16:37 )
 

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