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3.5.4 Faculty with Earned Doctorate PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 01 September 2009 12:41

3.5.4     Faculty with Earned Doctorate

At least 25 percent of the discipline course hours in each major at the baccalaureate level are taught by faculty members holding the terminal degree-usually the earned doctorate-in the discipline, or the equivalent of the terminal degree.

Responsible Unit: Division of Academic Affairs/IPAR

Compliance Judgment

Compliance

Narrative

Over 25% percent of the undergraduate courses in each undergraduate discipline at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University (A&T State University) are taught by faculty holding a terminal degree with one noted exception. This exception is Nursing, The doctorate is considered the terminal degree in all disciplines except in a few cases, such as creative writing, theatre arts, and landscape architecture.  Although a doctorate is available in landscape architecture, few institutions offer the doctorate and the master's degree continues to be considered terminal. Professional associations have determined that degrees other than the doctorate are equivalent to the terminal degree in creative writing and theatre.  The accompanying table, Fall Semester 2008 and Spring Semester 2009 Courses by Discipline and Faculty Terminal Degree, in the supporting documents clearly demonstrates A&T State University is in compliance with the noted exception [1]. In the table, A&T State University Degrees by School/College Fall 2008 and Spring 2009, shows that the majority of courses in the following schools/colleges by disciplines were taught by faculty with terminal degrees:  School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences-88.5%; College of Arts and Sciences-62.1%; School of Business and Economics-84.5%; School of Education-57.3%; College of Engineering-70.8%; and Interdisciplinary Studies-67.9% [2].

The following disciplines had the highest percentage of courses taught by faculty with non-terminal degrees: English (58.4%); Journalism and Mass Communication (58.4%); Political Science and Criminal Justice (40.7%); Visual and Performing Arts (46%); Human Performance and Leisure Studies (53.5%); Computer Science (44.6%); Interdisciplinary Studies (44.2%); Military Science (100%); Nursing (78%); Aerospace Studies (100%); Construction Management and Safety (46.6%);  Electronics, Computational and Information Technology (46.6%); and Manufacturing Systems (48.9%) [1]. With the noted exception of Nursing, in all cases in which students may obtain a baccalaureate degree, at least 25% of the courses taught in each discipline at the undergraduate level are taught by faculty with a terminal degree in the discipline.

A&T State University Office of Information Technology collects data including course inventory, faculty teaching load, and faculty degree status. Data generated from this office are used to create the documents for the Fall Semester 2008 and Spring Semester 2009 Courses by Discipline and Faculty Terminal Degree [1] and A&T State University Table of Degrees by School/College Fall 2008 and Spring 2009 [2].

The table, A&T State University Degrees by School/College Fall 2008 and Spring 2009 [2] reveals the number and percentage of discipline course hours in fall 2008 and spring 2009 semesters taught at the baccalaureate level of majors [3] within each school as well as each discipline and breaks down these percentages based upon the credentials of the faculty. Faculty credentials are listed in two groups: 1) faculty members who have the terminal degree in their discipline, and 2) faculty members who do not hold the terminal degree in their discipline (non-terminal degree) but have significant professional or experiential credentials that, in the university's judgment, make the person qualified to teach the course [1]. Qualifying criteria are based on the SACS Commission's guidelines specified in the response to Principle 3.7.1. The response to Principle 3.5.4 details the qualifications of the faculty teaching courses at A&T SU, and the requisite qualifications of  A&T SU faculty can be viewed in the credential reports in each academic department and the Faculty Roster document [4].

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University uses the Ph.D., Ed.D. or other doctoral level degrees as the definition of a "terminal" degree in almost all disciplines. Exceptions exist in such areas as:  Landscape Architecture, Theater Arts and Creative Writing.  A Masters in Landscape Architecture (MLA) and a Masters in Fine Arts (MFA) are considered the terminal degrees in each of these respective areas.  For a list of faculty members and their degrees by school/college, see the Faculty Roster [4]

In the non-terminal degree category, acceptable professional qualifications are best explained through an example.  In accounting, the major focuses on accounting practices of public accountants.   A faculty member without a doctoral degree but with significant business, government, or agency accounting experiences can be considered qualified based on his/her professional credentials including credentials such as the Certified Public Account (CPA) license. In addition to work experience, academic coursework and certification are considered a major part of the faculty employment decision. However, A&T State University School of Business has a long history of national accreditation through the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) International.  AACSB has rigorous accreditation standards which A&T's School of Business meets.

Faculty members in the professional degree category who have substantial experience in their chosen field are diverse. The faculty members in this group hold the master's degree in the discipline and have substantive experiences or recognition in their field for their accomplishments.

A & T State University meets the criteria that all majors at the baccalaureate level have more than 25% of the course hours taught by instructors with terminal degrees with the noted exception of Nursing (22%). On the broader school level, in the School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences 88.45% of the course hours were taught by instructors holding a terminal degree.  Within the School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology had the smallest percentage of course hours taught by instructors with terminal degrees, 83.3%. In the College of Arts and Sciences, 62.1% of the course hours were taught by instructors holding the terminal degree. Within the College of Arts and Sciences, English (41.6%) and Journalism and Mass Communication (41.6%) had the smallest percentage of course hours taught by instructors with terminal degrees.  In the School of Business and Economics, 57.3% of the course hours were taught by instructors with the terminal degree. Within the School of Business and Economics, Accounting had the smallest percentage of course hours taught by instructors with terminal degrees, 68.5%. In the School of Education, 57.3% of the course hours were taught by instructors holding a terminal degree. Within the School of Education, Human Performance and Leisure Studies had the smallest percentage of course hours taught by instructors with terminal degrees, 53.5%.  In the College of Engineering, 70.8% of the course hours were taught by instructors with terminal degrees. Within the College of Engineering, Computer Science had the smallest percentage of course hours taught by instructors with terminal degrees, 55.4%. In Interdisciplinary Studies, 55.8% of the course hours were taught by instructors with terminal degrees.  In the School of Nursing, 22% of the course hours were taught by instructors who held the terminal degree.  In the School of Technology, 49.6% of the course hours were taught by instructors holding the terminal degree. Within the School of Technology, Electronics, Computational and Information Technology had the smallest percentage of course hours taught by instructors with terminal degrees, 49.6%.  In each school/college, with the noted exception of nursing, well over 25% of the discipline course hours were taught by faculty holding the terminal degree in their respective discipline.

Supporting Documents

[1]      Courses by Discipline and Faculty Terminal Degree, Fall 2008 and Spring 2009

[2]      A&T State University Table of Degrees by School/College, Fall 2008 and Spring 2009

[3]      A&T State University Degrees

[4]      Faculty Roster-Faculty Credentials

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Last Updated ( Tuesday, 26 January 2010 16:05 )
 

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